Liverpool Beinnial Art Festival (part one*)

Yesterday, as part of a trip to help with our 2nd year studies we spent the day in Liverpool to attend the Beinnial Event where there were lots of exhibitions involving several museums and galleries around the city. The two galleries we went to were the Walker Art Gallery and the Tate, both consisting of various types of contemporary art and illustration. Personally i found the Walker Gallery to be useful due to it featuring multiple illustrations and paintings from different period of time, past and current, whereas the Tate was more of the contemporary art with the installations and sculptures it had even though there were a few illustrations and paintings and it was more modern compared to the Walker. Overall all of the exhibitions were engaging and useful as to what each art piece connotes and how they were made as to materials and style.

The images below are from the Walker Gallery

A Glass of Water, 1984 Michael Craig-Martin oil paint on aluminum and painted steel

A Glass of Water, 1984
Michael Craig-Martin
oil paint on aluminum and painted steel

This  image (above) was one of the first ones that i really liked it think that the structure and style of this piece is very comical and captures the illusion of the straw in the water breaking off well.

Head of the Stairs,2000 Ivor Abrahams Reinforced fibreglass, acrylic paint and varnish

Head of the Stairs,2000
Ivor Abrahams
Reinforced fibreglass, acrylic paint and varnish

WP_20141021_003[1]

This art piece was more on the contemporary side but i liked how the optical illusion made people stop and study it to try and make out what its supposed to be with the images painted on as well as the shape and structure of it.

Willendorf Venus, 1997 Claude Heath Oil paint,chalk and gesso on canvas

Willendorf Venus, 1997
Claude Heath
Oil paint, chalk and gesso on canvas

With this image i thought the subject was womens hairstyle, the third illustration from the left resembles of the back of a womans head with her hair in a bun on top of her head but after reading the information about the piece the artist had moved his finger along the outline of the figure whilst trying to make identical movements with a pencil in the other hand, when gone over the figure the page was rotated ninety degrees and he started again. Because of this he is questioning the making of a painting and the importance of control.

The Exiled Forever Coming in to Land Ged Quinn Oil paint on canvas

The Exiled Forever Coming in to Land, 2010
Ged Quinn
Oil paint on canvas

This was a popular painting in the Walker Gallery and possibly one of my favourite paintings. The painting had a lot of colour and detail throughout which makes it realistic yet the floating house makes the piece surreal. The inspiration of this has come from American artist Frederic Edwin Church with his work ‘Twilight in the Wilderness’ which reminded Quinn of apocalyptic visuals such as the film ‘independence day’. The building is to be based on the holiday home of German philosopher Heidegger because Quinn was painting this piece whilst reading about Heigegger’s hermit-like living in Germany’s Black forest. The artist has said the white horse is to relate to ‘a cheesy symbol of death and loved by fantasy poster artists’.

* Part two will consist of a few images from the Tate as above

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s